Sir Bagby, December 24, 1960

Sir Bagby, December 24, 1960

A hint: If you're going to steal milk and cookies from Santa, stealth and planning are important. First, make sure you eat quietly (and don't swizzle, it's rude). Second, prepare appropriate festive noises in the event that you do get caught, so you don't have to include a placeholder.

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Sir Bagby, December 21, 1960

Sir Bagby, December 21, 1960

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This strip brings up a few questions. First, why would you wrap up the tree the partridge was living in, either trapping him inside and suffocating him or effectively kicking him out of his house? Second, will Bagby be getting all the gifts on the list from the 12 Days of Christmas song? If so, wouldn't it be weird on day 8 when he gives 8 maids a-milking to a milkmaid? Or is the idea to give her some other maids to do her work for her?

Though I guess the key to comedy is to not overthink it.

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Sir Bagby, December 22, 1960

Sir Bagby, December 22, 1960

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Sir Bagby, by Bill and Rick Hackney, was a fairly obscure comic strip that ran from 1957-1966. That's a fairly respectable period of time, though it only ran in about 20 newspapers across the country. Still, I really enjoy the artwork, and the gags are at least as good as anything you see in the newspaper these days. It's a shame it didn't get more exposure. I wonder if Brant Parker and Johnny Hart were aware of it when they created The Wizard of Id, a similarly themed comic strip, in 1964.

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The Bungle Family, December 16, 1928

The Bungle Family, December 16, 1928

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The Bungle Family was created in 1918 by Harry Tuthill, and it's nearly impossible for me to separate it in my mind from The Nebbs, The Gumps, and The Dingbat Family, because they're all so similar in many ways, and as I stated a few days ago, are in some cases direct rip-offs of each other. Still, they're each enjoyable in their own way.

This one isn't necessarily Christmas related, but it does illustrate one of the perils of winter weather. While all of those who end up as "prosecuting witnesses" in this strip also end up in the hospital, it's a wonder that George Bungle doesn't as well. He falls over three times in this strip alone, and who knows how many more times after the scene shifts. He must have a quite a hard head, in more ways than one.

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Thimble Theater, December 24, 1920

Thimble Theater, December 24, 1920

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This is a very early Thimble Theater, nearly 10 years before Popeye would appear. At this time Olive Oyl was in love with Harold Hamgravy, who we see here coming up with a romantic idea that falls flat. After Popeye appeared in 1929, he was so popular that he replaced Hamgravy completely. I'd guess it's because he didn't pull stunts like this.

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